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Responding to the world’s worst humanitarian crises in a great variety of roles, the International Rescue Committee’s staff is a force for humanity and hope. If you’re skilled and passionate, we’d like to add your energy to ours. 

IRC careers FAQ

Careers at the IRC are as wide-ranging and far-reaching as our work in more than 40 countries and 29 U.S. cities. Encouraging staff development through promotion, transfer and rehire, the IRC nurtures long-term career paths and helps employees grow within the organization.

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What is it like to work for the IRC?

The IRC applies our mission of care and protection to those who fulfill it—our staff. We are committed to promoting their safety and wellness, and to providing them with an environment of respect in which to work.

The IRC values the diversity of our staff and recognizes that our work is best accomplished through the true collaboration of individuals from many cultures with a great variety of skills and perspectives. In support of this core value, the IRC maintains and enforces policies to foster relationships that respect the dignity and worth of each individual.

We uphold our policies in accordance with principles of international law and codes of good conduct, and we affirm that all IRC staff members are responsible for promoting fundamental human rights, social justice, human dignity and the equality of men, women and children. IRC staff must treat every person without distinction on the basis of his or her race, gender, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, marital status, sexual orientation, age or disability.

The IRC’s senior management recognizes the importance of open communication, encouraging staff to discuss job related problems or suggestions with their supervisors without fear of reprisal.

The IRC Way

The IRC and IRC workers must adhere to the values and principles outlined in IRC Way - Standards for Professional Conduct. These are Integrity, Service, and Accountability. In accordance with these values, the IRC operates and enforces policies on Beneficiary Protection from Exploitation and Abuse, Child Safeguarding, Anti Workplace Harassment, Fiscal Integrity, and Anti-Retaliation.

How can I search and apply for open jobs?

To access all of IRC’s open job opportunities in various sectors and locations visit our job search page, where you'll also see a listing of the most urgent jobs. 

Can I intern with the IRC?

A limited number of internships and fellowships are available in international and U.S.-based programs.

The IRC Fellows Program has introduced hundreds of students, health professionals, attorneys and teachers to the field of humanitarian assistance.

Attracted by the IRC's spirit and tradition of service, they return to their studies or careers changed by the experience. As congressional aides, doctors, journalists, academics and staff of other relief and human rights organizations, they are among the world’s best advocates for refugees. Others have continued on as dedicated and successful employees of the IRC.

There are two types of opportunities in the Fellows Program:

• Those open to all applicants and posted at Rescue.org/careers

• Those filled exclusively through specific institutions

The IRC is proud to have established strong partnerships with universities and institutions, including Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Harvard, The New School, Pfizer, and the United Federation of Teachers, to create fellowship programs designed to enhance the academic, professional and life experiences of participants in addition to supporting the health, protection and education work of the IRC.

Search for an open internship opportunity.

Can I volunteer with the IRC?

The IRC’s regional resettlement offices rely on volunteers to support their work assisting refugees who are adjusting to a new life in the United States.

Learn more about IRC volunteer opportunities. 

Our team in action

Rescuing lives

Strange is our situation here on Earth. Each of us comes for a short visit, not knowing why, yet sometimes seeming to divine a purpose. From the standpoint of daily life, however, there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men.

Albert EinsteinNobel Prize-winning physicist and humanitarian at whose call the International Rescue Committee was founded in 1933