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A young girl is held in her mothers arms at a detention center as the family seeks asylum at the United States border, where many children have been separated from their parents
Separated children

Families belong together

People arriving at the U.S. border have the right to request asylum without being criminalized, turned back, or separated from their children. Your gift can help us support asylum seekers and other vulnerable people worldwide.

Learn why families are seeking safety in the U.S.

Help asylum seekers and refugees by giving $50 per month.

$USD

Delivering lasting impact

The IRC helps people to survive, recover and rebuild their lives.

We serve

people whose lives have been upended by war, conflict and natural disasters

We work

in countries where people don’t have the support they need to recover from crisis

We respond

within 72 hours, staying to help countries stabilize and people rebuild their lives

We resettle

refugees welcomed by the United States, helping them to succeed and thrive

News & features

Press updates

Why the IRC

Founded at the suggestion of Albert Einstein, the IRC is a gold-standard organization working in some of the toughest neighborhoods around the globe.

Nicholas KristofColumnist for The New York Times, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, and son of a refugee

Stories of welcome

When we welcome refugees, they change our lives and communities for the better.

  • Charlee mentioned I impacted her confidence, but that’s something I learned from her ... You don’t realize that you are impacting other people’s lives. That was really touching to hear."
    Christelle Igihozo, a college student and aspiring actress from Congo, has helped her first friends in the U.S. believe in themselves.
  • If I didn’t have Kim’s friendship or the friendships of many people I’ve met in this country, I would feel like I did when I was a young girl: completely alone. "
    As a transgender woman in Honduras, fashion designer Lincy Sopall faced abuse, violence and persecution. Then she found welcome as her first customer in the U.S. became her closest friend.
  • I wanted someone to teach me things related to the country like laws and regulations. But then we became close friends and I see him as a father. My children call him Grandpa Dave. "
    A refugee from Congo, Robert Sebatware was surprised when a stranger on his doorstep quickly became one of his closest friends.